Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Question about arms
F F U R G > Tips & Tricks > 3.75" Scale Customs Tips & Tricks
rogue82
Hi there, I'm in need of some assistance.
I'm looking for a set of arms that bend like the contracted arm in the third image.


I know most hinged arms can perform both the relaxed and semi contracted poses but are there any figures that go as far as the contracted pose or further? If not does anybody have any idea how to make them? I do still need them to be articulated.
Any help would be great.

Chris
clonecommander972
i might have an idea, but it could be expensive, depending...
Revoltech makes a series of transformers and mecha anime figures that can be taken apart so the joints are entirely seperate. the smallest figures are about 4" (about the size of the legacy grievous or a wookie figure) but some of the joints are doubled, particularly the neck post. here's a link to one, but they're getting rather hard to find, unfortunately sad.gif

if i have time, i'll post pictures of the one i have, dissasembled~
pbarny
QUOTE (rogue82 @ Mar 30 2011, 02:29 AM) *
Hi there, I'm in need of some assistance.
I'm looking for a set of arms that bend like the contracted arm in the third image.


I know most hinged arms can perform both the relaxed and semi contracted poses but are there any figures that go as far as the contracted pose or further? If not does anybody have any idea how to make them? I do still need them to be articulated.
Any help would be great.

Chris


So you want an arm that can pose to make an angle of less than 90degrees (probably in the 20-40 degree range) between the proximal and distal ends under bicep control, correct?

I know you can make a notch in the elbow joint in the distal side (forearm) in the current gi joe figures (25th aniversary or later lines) and you can go beyond 90, maybe get as much as 70 degrees but not much farther. You could go farther, but it becomes a trade off on "articulation" vs appearance (big chunk of arm missing).
rogue82
QUOTE (clonecommander972 @ Mar 30 2011, 11:38 AM) *
i might have an idea, but it could be expensive, depending...
Revoltech makes a series of transformers and mecha anime figures that can be taken apart so the joints are entirely seperate. the smallest figures are about 4" (about the size of the legacy grievous or a wookie figure) but some of the joints are doubled, particularly the neck post. here's a link to one, but they're getting rather hard to find, unfortunately sad.gif

if i have time, i'll post pictures of the one i have, dissasembled~

Not a bad idea I'll see what I can find and I'd love to see those pictures.

QUOTE (pbarny @ Mar 30 2011, 05:44 PM) *
So you want an arm that can pose to make an angle of less than 90degrees (probably in the 20-40 degree range) between the proximal and distal ends under bicep control, correct?

I know you can make a notch in the elbow joint in the distal side (forearm) in the current gi joe figures (25th aniversary or later lines) and you can go beyond 90, maybe get as much as 70 degrees but not much farther. You could go farther, but it becomes a trade off on "articulation" vs appearance (big chunk of arm missing).

Have you tried this on any figures and would you suggest any figure in particular? Ideally not too heavy clothing or armour.
pbarny
QUOTE (rogue82 @ Mar 31 2011, 08:30 AM) *
Have you tried this on any figures and would you suggest any figure in particular? Ideally not too heavy clothing or armour.


I wouldn't do it. The people who I've seen tried it I would call "articulation nuts" dry.gif If a level or piece of articulation can be added, they want it never minding the aesthetic quality. For me there has to be a trade off, you can only put so much articulation in, before it begins to detract, especially on the smaller figures.
rogue82
Probably going to use the new jedi luke vintage for the arms on this one. Its not quite a fully compressed arm but it should get most of the way for my needs.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.